Long-term results of dorsally displaced distal radius fractures treated with the pi-plate: is hardware removal necessary?

Τίτλος

Long-term results of dorsally displaced distal radius fractures treated with the pi-plate: is hardware removal necessary?

Συγγραφείς

Tyllianakis ME, Panagopoulos AM, Saridis A. Orthopedics. 2011 Jul 7;34(7):e282-6.

Στοιχεία Δημοσίευσης

Orthopedics. 2011 Jul 7;34(7):e282-6. doi: 10.3928/01477447-20110526-10. PubMed PMID: 21717990.

Περίληψη

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of patients treated with open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) using dorsal plates and screws (AO/ASIF pi-plate) for dorsally displaced fractures of the distal radius. Although extensor tendon rupture is a recognized complication of all distal radial fractures, there appears to be an increased risk of this using dorsal plating. In addition, there is the added complication of extensor tendon irritation and dorsal wrist pain, which may necessitate plate removal. The low-profile pi-plates intended to overcome this problem have not done so, with quoted rates ranged from 19% to 55%.We treated 32 completely evaluated patients (13 men and 19 women) in our department between 2000 and 2004, with an average age of 46 years. They underwent ORIF of dorsally displaced fractures of the distal radius using the specially designed pi-plate. Bone graft was used in 18 patients who had significant metaphyseal defect. Clinical examination, plain radiographs, and functional assessments using the modified Mayo Wrist Score were performed at an average follow-up of 86 months (range, 56-115 months). Satisfactory reduction was achieved in all 32 fractures at the time of operative fixation with no instances of loss of fracture reduction during the study period. According to the Mayo Wrist Score, 23 patients (72%) had excellent or very good results, 7 (22%) had fair results, and 2 (6%) had poor results. Two cases (6.25%) of extensor tendon rupture were noted during the first postoperative month, and 2 other patients showed progressive weakness of index finger extension 6 months postoperatively. The remaining 28 patients had no soft tissue problems.